Archive for Dual enrollment

SEDONA RED ROCK HIGH SCHOOL OFFERING THREE DUAL ENROLLMENT COURSES IN 2017 – 18

Students receive both high school and college credit upon successful completion

In an Inter-Governmental Agreement approved by the Yavapai College District Governing Board at its June 13, 2017 meeting the Sedona Red Rock high school will be allowed to offer a total of three dual enrollment courses in 2017 – 18. Under the agreement, the high school provides space, qualified faculty to teach the courses and almost all of the other expenses associated with the program. Yavapai Community College will provide appropriate college credit for students who successfully complete a dual enrollment course and some oversight.

It is noted that in a similar agreement that Mingus Union High School was allowed to offer 16 dual enrollment classes while Camp Verde High School was allowed to offer 15 dual enrollment classes.

 

CAMP VERDE HIGH SCHOOL OFFERING 15 DUAL ENROLLMENT COURSES IN 2017 – 18

Students receive both high school and college credit 

Because of an Inter-Governmental Agreement approved by the Yavapai College District Governing Board at its June 13, 2017 meeting the Camp Verde high school will be allowed to offer a total of 15 dual enrollment courses in 2017 – 18. Under the agreement, the high school provides space, qualified faculty to teach the courses and almost all of the other expenses associated with the program. Yavapai Community College will provide appropriate college credit for students who successfully complete a dual enrollment course and some oversight.

MINGUS UNION HIGH SCHOOL OFFERING 16 DUAL ENROLLMENT COURSES IN 2017 – 18

Students receive both high school and college credit upon successful completion

In an Inter-Governmental Agreement approved by the Yavapai College District Governing Board at its June 13, 2017 meeting Mingus Union high school will be allowed to offer a total of 16 dual enrollment courses in 2017 – 18. Under the agreement, the high school provides space, qualified faculty to teach the courses and almost all of the other expenses associated with the program. Yavapai Community College will provide appropriate college credit for students who successfully complete a dual enrollment course and some oversight.

It is noted that Camp Verde high school is offering 15 dual enrollment classes while the Sedona high school is offering three dual enrollment classes.

Students must meet certain qualifications before they are allowed to take a dual enrollment course and obtain college credit upon completion. The list of courses and number of credits follows below.

 

13 COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS AGREE TO OFFER DUAL ENROLLMENT CLASSES

College classes taught by high school teachers in 13 County High Schools will obtain college credit because of agreement with Yavapai College

Thirteen high schools in the County have signed a dual enrollment agreement with Yavapai Community College. The agreement was approved by the District Governing Board at its June 13, 2017 meeting. Under the agreement the high schools can offer certain dual enrollment classes at the high schools taught by high school teachers.  Students who are qualified for the classes upon successful completion receive both high school and college credit. The credits are accepted by most Arizona post-secondary colleges and universities. (Students should, of course, always check with the college or university they intend to enroll in after graduating from high school to determine whether the dual enrollment credits will be recognized.)

Although the high schools absorb most of the cost for dual enrollment courses, the College is insisting on collecting $10 per student per credit for them.  A list of the 13 high schools appears below. The list includes all public Verde Valley high schools.

 

COLLEGE AWASH WITH TAXPAYER REVENUE

ENDS BUDGETED YEAR WITH OVER $5 MILLION IN  UNSPENT FUNDS

The College Administration will report to the Governing Board at its meeting on Tuesday, August 9, 2016 that it ended the 2015-16 (twelve months ended June 30, 2016) academic year with over $5 million dollars in surplus revenue.  This is revenue that was budgeted but not spent in the 2015-16 budget.

money flowing like water 3The College Administration will report excess revenue in the General Fund Budget of $2,208,713. It will also report revenue in the Unexpended Plant Fund in excess of $2,770,000. Finally, it will report excess revenue in the Auxiliary budget of $123,621.

Given all the excess revenue, why did it demand in June, 2016 a fee barrier be erected for qualified students in the County-wide dual enrollment program? Recall that in June, 2016 the College indicated it needed to assess a per credit fee on qualified high school students taking dual enrollment classes and got the Governing Board to approve the increase so it could get around $100,000 in new revenue from the high schools.

Also recall that in presenting its request for a per credit fee for the dual enrollment program in December, 2015 and January, 2016 it never mentioned a budgetary need.  By the way, the new fee imposed by the College may prevent poor high school students from taking dual enrollment courses. The College does not seem to care.

The only conclusion one can reach is that  the priorities of this Administration are on buildings; not education.

WHAT HAPPENED TO DUAL ENROLLMENT HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER STIPEND?

HAS COLLEGE GONE BACK ON JANUARY PROMISE?

Despite objections from all seven Verde Valley superintendents to imposing a per credit fee on high school students in the dual enrollment program, President Penelope Wills pushed ahead with her fee demand. Her demand was approved by the Governing Board June 14 via an intergovernmental agreement and students will now pay $10 per credit while in high school taking a dual enrollment credit course. 

QUESTION FACEOf concern is the fact that the Intergovernmental agreement approved by the Governing Board June 14 does not contain any provision for continuing the small stipend that the College was paying each high school instructor who was teaching a dual enrollment class.  Under intense questioning from Deb McCasland, the College stated that it would not pay anything toward the teachers.  There was no mention of the stipend. (You may view the June 14 questioning by Ms. McCasland at the Board meeting by clicking here.)

At the January, 2016 Governing Board meeting, interim Vice President Scott Farnsworth was specifically asked about the stipend.  He specifically stated it would continue.

So where is the stipend?  Why isn’t it in the contract?  How much of a stipend will be paid to each teacher and who decides this amount?  Who decides what teaches will receive the stipend?  What is the total amount to be paid out?  Who decides the total?

Thanks to the Blog and Representative Deb Mc Casland this issue will be raised at the next Governing Board meeting in August. At that time the public should receive information about whether the stipend was discontinued or is to be continued. Hopefully, the public should also discover  the criteria and amount to be paid to each teacher. (And how that was decided.)

WILLS GETS HER WAY ON DUAL ENROLLMENT FEES

ONLY REPRESENTATIVE MC CASLAND RAISES QUESTIONS

President Penelope Wills was able to easily snooker the District Governing Board at its June 14, 2016 meeting when it came to getting approval for dual enrollment contracts that set fees on high school students and eliminated teacher stipend support. The contracts sailed through the Board with only Representative Deb McCasland raising questions about them. (It was a 5-0 vote as the Verde Valley representatives capitulated.) The fees all go to administration of the program. During the six month fight over the fee, the College never offered a study or provided an in-depth look at the need for such a program for the County.  It was all about collecting as much money as it could from the high schools.

poor 3 faculty member

How good is your memory on this educational fiasco administered by Wills? 

Recall that all of the high school superintendents in the Verde Valley opposed the College setting fees on high school students for the dual enrollment program. Wills ignored their pleas.

Recall that all of the seven-member Blue Ribbon Verde Valley Governing Board Advisory Board opposed setting fees on high school students for the dual enrollment program. Wills ignored their pleas.

Recall that  Deb McCasland opposed setting fees on high school students in the dual enrollment program at the January, 2016 meeting. Wills ignored her.

Recall that Al Filardo seemed on the fence in December, 2015 and January 2016 but must have decided to support Wills. 

Recall that Wills claimed $78,000 was annually needed for dual enrollment when she demanded a property tax rate increase in 2015. She got her way in a 3-2 vote to increase taxes with West County representatives voting as a block to approve it.

Recall that Wills claimed $53,634 for a dual enrollment liaison was annually needed for dual enrollment for a when she demanded a property tax rate increase in 2015 (it was granted in a 3-2 vote with West County representatives voting as a block).

Recall that the State of Arizona provides the Community College with money for dual enrollment; in 2016 the College estimated the total to be $30,153. In May 2013 (See Governing Board Agenda for that date with PowerPoint) the College stated it received $63,777 from the State for Dual Enrollment support. Who knows why the decline, if there was one.  Who can you trust?

Recall that Superintendent Paul Tighe told the Governing Board on January 12, 2016 that a fee would inhibit access by high school students to the dual enrollment program.

Recall that the College used to provide a stipend to high school teachers in dual enrollment programs, which is said was $82,000 in 2015. It has eliminated that stipend under its new approach. Or at least, the stipend does not appear in the contract approved at the June 14 meeting.  

Recall that tax rate analysis of Community Colleges in Arizona says Yavapai College spends double the state average per student in primary property taxes. Gosh, couldn’t some of that money be used for dual enrollment? Or should it go toward replacing existing good roads and sidewalks with even better ones?

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Wills rejects any assistance from College to poor families for dual enrollment program

Says high schools need to ask their foundations to support the poor and economically challenged families

On February 3, 2015 Yavapai Community College President Penelope Wills answered questions about post-secondary problems, which were put to here by the Blue-Ribbon Verde Valley Board Advisory Committee.  One of those questions asked whether the College would give special consideration to the poor and economically challenged families whose children wanted to take dual enrollment courses but could not afford the new fee the College intends to impose on them.

Wills’ made it clear she has little sympathy for their plight. Her bottom line solution to paying for the College credits was to have County High School Foundations, if they exist, provide for them.

poor 3 faculty member

In her response to the VVBAC question, which you can listen to in full by clicking here, she listed a number of gripes she had with the County High Schools over this program.  They included:  

  • Some High schools are irresponsibly “going wild” when asking for dual enrollment classes.
  • Some students don’t have “skin-in-the-game,” which probably means she believes they don’t take the courses seriously unless they have to pay something for them.
  • Students are “skipping” Yavapai Community College after graduation (anyone wonder why?)
  • Administrative costs have suddenly mushroomed, with her estimate being that it now costs $300,000 in administration to run the program.
  • Offers by High Schools to take over administration costs have been rejected by the College because not all High Schools have the capability of providing the data.
  • The College doesn’t get tuition from the students (even though it doesn’t provide faculty, rooms, utilities, transportation, etc.)
  • The best success for dual enrollment programs is to hold them on a college campus.

 

Wills’ says dual enrollment has suddenly become “big”

Does just released data from June, 2015 audit question or support that view?  What about 1996-2005 data?

On February 3, 2015 Dr. Penelope Wills answered questions about a variety of issues put to her by the Verde Valley Governing Board Advisory Committee.  One of them involved the dual enrollment program.  During her response, she suggested that the programs are now big and suddenly costly.

However, data just released by the auditors in a report dated June, 2015 (represented by the first chart below) seems to raise some question about the sudden growth of dual enrollment. This is particular the case since in May, 2013 the College appeared happy with a report that found it was essentially breaking even with the dual enrollment program.  The auditors used Full-time-Student-Equivalent as the marker.

Note the headcount enrollment figures beginning back in 1996 and leading up to 2006–a period without a recession.

 

dual enrollment report 2014 2015

Make you own conclusion:  Is Wills’ correct when she lays blame for the decline in student enrollment to the fact the state has moved out of the 2007-2010 recession?  What about the enrollment prior to the recession?  

 

The Wills’ priorities: Buildings, buildings, buildings. Not education

Wills places too low of a priority on education of students within the County; assessing dual enrollment fee on High School Juniors and Seniors her latest educational sin–it’s time for a new president

Commentary

Commentary

Yavapai Community College President Penelope Wills places education of Yavapai County students far too low on her list of priorities. At the top of her educational agenda are buildings, buildings, building, despite a 5,000 drop in student enrollment, which is continuing under her presidency.

Think about it:  She is anticipating spending $119 million on new building projects while student enrollment at the College continues to plumet.  And look at some of the projects.

She spent thousands of dollars in 2014 to build a concrete patio seating facility into the bank of a hill overlooking the College ballpark.  Critics say it was a complete waste of money since few use it (there are bleachers around the field).  She has also spent millions of dollar converting the 1105 student auditorium into a dinner theatre.  No additional seating; only amenities with no added educational value.

She spent over $1 million dollars to build a professional tennis complex where there is no College tennis team.  The Prescott Campus swimming pool and therapy pools are carefully groomed although the College has no swim team.

Building projects that waste money

Her latest assault on education is her determination to force Yavapai High Schools to pay at least $10 per credit for taking dual enrollment classes at the high school.  That fee will be assessed beginning this fall. The dual enrollment classes provide qualified Junior and senior high school students with an opportunity to earn a limited number of college credits while still in high school. High schools provide transportation, classrooms, heat, light, air conditioning, qualified instructors, high tech equipment, counselling and maintenance.  The College provides minimal administrative support and a tiny stipend per high school teacher.   The cost per student will now be at least $30 and will no doubt go up each year once it is in place.

How high schools will pay the fee is unclear.  For many students, especially in rural areas, the dual enrollment program is the only opportunity they will have to take college courses.  For some, who are poor, the fee will mean that they will not be able to take the college courses. Some high school districts, such das Camp Verde, will most likely drop the program.  The district simply cannot afford to pay the fee. 

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