Archive for Enrollment data

SPRING 2018 ENROLLMENT SLIGHTLY UP DISTRICT WIDE

Flat or “slightly up” good news for Yavapai College say administrators

Vice President for Instruction and Student Development, Dr. Ron Liss, reported on the latest enrollment data at the February 2018 Governing Board meeting. List said that enrollment was slightly up for the spring semester.  This, he said, was good news, as other community colleges in Arizona were reporting a decline.

You may view his very short report on the video below.

 

SPRING ENROLLMENT FOR CREDIT COURSES ON VERDE CAMPUS DOWN SLIGHTLY

Sedona way up; Upward trend in non-credit offerings through OSA and Dual Enrollment; overall serving about 3,000 students

Dean James Perey reported that enrollment in traditional credit courses on the Verde Campus was down slightly in the spring of 2018. In spring 2017 it enrolled 1,533 students compared to 1,433 this spring (-100). However, there was an upward trend in offerings through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute’s programs and Community Education. Sedona showed a huge leap.

 

AUDITED REPORT SHOWS 2016-17 CONTINUED DISTRICT-WIDE DOWNWARD ENROLLMENT PLUNGE FOR CREDIT CLASSES

Reaches lowest number of students taking courses for credit  in 10 Years

The Community College released its annual audited Financial Report for 2016-17 at the February 2018 Governing Board meeting.  According to that report, enrollment by headcount District wide for students taking courses for credit was at its lowest level in a decade at 10,000.  In 2007/08 the student headcount was 15,582.

The Prescott Campus continued its slide.  It reported 1,149 FTSE in 2017-8 compared to 1,229 a year earlier (decline of 80 FTSE).  In 2007/08 the Prescott Campus reported 2,137 FTSE (difference of 988 FTSE).  The Verde Campus showed a FTSE decline of 8 over the previous year while the Prescott Valley Center showed a decline of 21 FTSE.  The Sedona Center reported only 1 FTSE, which was the same for the previous year.

The following is the report released in the College’s audited report.

COCONINO COLLEGE DOWN BY 12%; LOSS OF NAU RESIDENCE HALLS & REDUCED EMPHASIS ON VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS BLAMED

Lack of sufficient funding also an issue 

President Penelope Wills told the College Governing Board at its November meeting that Coconino Community College had experienced a 12% drop in enrollment by headcount. She attributed the drop to a decision by Northern Arizona University (NAU) to close its residence halls to first-year Coconino students. Without the residence halls, she said students outside Flagstaff were unable to enroll in Coconino.

She also attributed the drop to a deemphasis by Coconino Community College on Career and Technical Education programs. Finally, he said that a lack of proper funding for the Community College may have also played a role.

President Wills comments on this issue can be viewed in the two minute video below. You may also view a video of the entire Board meeting by clicking here and then clicking on “Meeting Videos.”

ENROLLMENT SLIGHTLY UP IN FALL SEMESTER

Increase of 78 students over 2016; Wills says recruiting not a focus for the College until about two years ago. Says nothing about new Sedona program or efforts by Verde Valley Board Advisory Committee in re marketing begun three years ago

 Tom Hughes, Director of the Office of Institutional Effectiveness & Research, reported to the Yavapai Community College  Governing Board on November 14 that fall enrollment had increased slightly in the district. There was a 1.1% increase in student headcount over 2016 and a .3% increase in the fall time student equivalents data.

President Penelope Wills attributed the increase to new recruiting efforts.  Wills said the College had not focused on recruitment until about two years ago.   (Wills did not mention the efforts by the Verde Valley Board Advisory Committee’s work  begun about three years ago and the Committee’s alarm at the low level of recruiting activity by the College.)

Also not discussed by Wills as a reason for the slight enrollment increase in headcount is the  opening the Sedona Center culinary Institute. At least 70 students were enrolled this fall in that program. Regardless of the reasons for the increase, this was good news for the Community College as there are indications that some similar institutions in the State are experiencing a decline in enrollment.

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FIRST TIME IN SIX YEARS COLLEGE SEES INCREASED ENROLLMENT

Headcount up by 1.6% over last fall and total credit hours up by .7%

Dr. Ron Liss, who oversees instruction, and  student development for Yavapai College, reported to the Governing Board at its September session that for the first time in six years Yavapai Community College has shown increased fall enrollment. The total headcount District-wide was up this fall by 1.6%. The total number of credits being taken by students District-wide this fall was reported at .7%.

Liss credited the reopening of the Sedona Center and several other factors that resulted in the increase.  He gave a special “thank you” to the staff for their hard work in helping the College enrollment increase.

You may view his video report announcing increased enrollment below.

COLLEGE SAYS HEADCOUNT ENROLLMENT DISTRICT-WIDE IS UP 4.7% FOR FALL SEMESTER

Sedona Center enrollment up 1,235%

The College announced at the District Governing Board meeting on August 8, 2017 that headcount enrollment District-wide is up by 4.7%. In making the announcement, the College noted that it had been a long time since it had been able to announce enrollment was increasing. It also noted that enrollment at the Sedona Center was up by 1,235%. (Last year at this time enrollment at the Sedona Center was reported at 14.)

The Blog surmises the headcount is finally increasing for three reasons:  First, the administration is now using the telephone to contact students who they identified should have enrolled but did not for a variety of possible reasons. Second,  greater flexibility on dates to enroll. Third, the opening of the Sedona Center.

The announcement as reported to the District Governing Board by Dr. Liss follows below.

 

PERSONAL TELEPHONE CALLING SIGNIFICANTLY HELPS ENROLLMENT

Phone calls reduce number of students who do not continue from fall to spring semester from 14% to 7%

Yavapai Community College has adopted the old fashioned approach of calling persons who indicate that they are not continuing to the spring semester after completing the fall semester. According to the College’s Vice President of Instruction and Student Development Ron Liss, the calling has been very successful.  For example, the College lost 14% of students in 2016 between the fall and spring semesters. However, this year because of the work by the Student Development Department, that number was cut in half. Only 7% of students who completed the fall semester did not return for the spring semester. Repeated calling students who were identified as failing to register for the spring semester is credited with the reduction.

Dr. Liss also says that the College is starting earlier and extending the semester in an effort to be more user friendly. You may view Dr. Liss’s report on spring enrollment to the Governing Board by clicking on the video below.

DECLINE IN ENROLLMENT CONTINUES

Slide begun ten years ago continues

The College reported at the February 14, 2317 Governing Board meeting that enrollment was down district-wide by 4% in the fall, 2016 and by 2% in the spring, 2016.  The College seemed happy the spring reduction was not as great as the fall.

As the College has done for years now, it blamed the absence of a recession and was content to say its decline was similar to that of other community colleges.  The College and the Governing Board has done little to focus on the reasons for the decline.

The College stated that by simply calling students who had not re-registered for the spring semester, it caused several to do so.  (Not rocket science.)  This seemed to the Administration a novel idea.

The Verde Campus has shown a slight increase in enrollment (using headcount) over the past two years.

Here is a chart showing the decline of enrollment by more than 6,000 students over the past several years using actual headcount as announced by the College.

 

 

DISTRICT ENROLLMENT SLIDES AGAIN IN SPRING, 2017 — VERDE CAMPUS UP

College reports to District Governing Board a 2% decline in Spring, 2017 enrollment; Verde Campus up

The College will report at the Tuesday, February 14 meeting of the District Governing Board that it has continued its ten-year slide in enrollment for students seeking college credit classes as measured by headcount.  According to data provided the public by the College prior to the meeting, total student (for-credit) enrollment in Spring 2017 is down 2% compared to spring, 2016.

The College will also report that the Verde Valley Campus experienced a “slight increase” in its on-campus headcount–a trend in the last two years. The Verde Valley Fall Community education programs  grew by 11%.

Online enrollment increased by 6% but the increase did not prevent the College from an overall decline as measured by headcount.  

The fall 2016 enrollment by the independently run Osher Life Long Learning non-profit corporation grew  by 22% when compared to fall 2015.  

The College did not report out the total comparative data regarding fall, 2016 enrollment in advance of the Tuesday, February 14 meeting.

Note that despite the continued decline in actual students, those who registered at the College took more classes for college credit when compared to students enrolling in spring, 2016. (Thus the Full-time Student Equivalent comparison.)  The following graph will be presented to the Governing Board at the Tuesday meeting by the College.