Archive for LEAD program

“LEAD” FREE BRIDGE PROGRAM TO CONTINUE BUT ENROLLMENT DOESN’T MAX OUT.” WHY?

Total enrollment of 26 when program could enroll 44; does it need additional leadership help from high schools and College to help with underserved population and others?

[A BLOG SPECIAL REPORT.] President Penelope Wills reported to the District Governing Board at its June meeting that a total of 26 high school students had enrolled in the LEAD program this year. There were 11 students from the Verde Valley and 15 students from Prescott. Wills gave few other details regarding the program. (See video below.) She said the program will continue.

The eight-week LEAD program is intended to pave the path for students who express interest in college but for various reasons might never make it. It was designed in cooperation with the Yavapai County Education Service Agency specifically for graduates who face distractions in their life outside of school that may create barriers to continuing their education.  

Former Yavapai College Vice President for Instruction and Student Development, Dr. Stuart Blacklaw, said: “The Lead seeks to create an environment that leads to a successful start in college. Some students have no trouble moving from high school graduation in the spring to college matriculation in the fall. Others find those intervening months filled with distractions. The Lead program is designed to move college-minded students directly to campus after high school graduation, before life elements deter them from their college aspirations.”

Given that the program it is free and aimed at a particular segment of the high school graduates who without it might not attend college without it, does it need additional emphasis by the administration to obtain full enrollment?

The blog is concerned that all 44 possible seats were not filled in any of the three years of the program. This is a concern because the program can apparently provide educational opportunities for the underserved population of students that Wills and others claim they worry about.

Background: When former Yavapai Community College Vice President for Instruction and Student Development Stuart Blacklaw created the LEAD program, it was designed to accept from 15 to 22 students annually in the program on each side of Mingus Mountain (total 30 to 44). Participation is completely free for students — the costs of courses, books, meals and activities are all covered.  Students have the opportunity to earn 6 college credits and participate in college preparation activities.

Housing difference: The program is offered at both the Verde Valley and Prescott campuses. However, there is one big difference between the settings of the program: On-campus housing and meal plans are provided for students participating at the Prescott campus. No housing was provided for students participating on the Verde Campus. Participants are responsible for their transportation to and from the program – any transportation required during program activities will be provided.

2015 Enrollment: In 2015 the program enrolled 12 students on the Verde Campus, according to Executive Dean Dr. James Perey. He reported that there were 3 students from Camp Verde and 9 from Mingus Union High School. There were no applications coming from Sedona Red Rock High School. On the Prescott side, where students are provided free dormitory rooms and food, it attracted 24 students. Of the 24 students who are living in dorms on the Prescott side of the County, two are from Camp Verde High School and two from Mingus Union High School.  

2016 Enrollment:  In 2016 there were 14 students enrolled on the Verde Campus for the LEAD program.  For the first time, it included two students from Sedona Redrock high school.  The Blog has been unable to obtain any information about the number of students enrolled on the Prescott side, if any.  Because of the absence of any press releases regarding the LEAD program on the Prescott side of the County, the Blog assumes it was not run on that side in 2016.  In addition, a request for information about 2016 funding the program made to the Foundation was ignored.

2017 Enrollment:  President Penelope Wills reported to the District Governing Board at its June 13, 2017 meeting that 11 students had enrolled in the program on the Verde Campus. She also reported that 15 students had enrolled on the Prescott Campus. You may view her one-minute report to the Governing Board on the video below.

Financing: In 2015 “The Yavapai College Foundation provided over $60,000 to fund the LEAD program in its entirely because we feel strongly that helping at-risk youth who have academic potential and want to attend college overcome personal challenges is an important step in helping the next generation succeed,” said Paul Kirchgraber, Director of Development for the Foundation. It received a substantial amount of grant money from the American Association of University women.

However, since its first year, neither the College nor the Foundation have provided any financial details. Dr. Blacklaw indicated in 2015 that the College could use federal TRIO funding to support the project. Unless the College releases financial data regarding how this program is supported, the residence of Yavapai County will be left in the dark.

 

See Dr. Blacklaws’ six-minute explanation of the program below.

 

LEAD classes underway; only 6 LEAD students on Verde Campus

Earlier estimate of 12 LEAD students on Verde Campus proves incorrect; only 6 of 24 slots taken on Verde; all 24 taken in Prescott

Classes are underway for the summer bridge program the College calls “LEAD.”  This program allows students who might not otherwise choose college to gain free college credit in a College-like learning environment during the summer.  The program attracted a final total of 6 students to the Verde campus, all from Mingus Union High School.  On the Prescott side, where students are provided free dormitory rooms and food, it attracted 24 students.

LEAD SUMMER PROGRAMOf the 24 students who are living in dorms on the Prescott side of the County, two are from Camp Verde High School and two from Mingus Union High School.  According to Dean Blacklaw, there were no nominations from Sedona Red Rock High School for the free academic program.  

There were 18 open slots for the program remaining when it began on the Verde Campus.

 

LEAD program has 12 students on Verde Campus

Twelve of 24 spots filled in LEAD program on Verde Campus

The eight-week pilot LEAD program, which begins this summer, has 12 students in it, according to Executive Dean Dr. James Perey. He reported that there are 3 students from Camp Verde and 9 from Mingus Union High School. There were no applications coming from Sedona Red Rock High School.

LEAD SUMMER PROGRAMThis is a particularly important new program because it is intended to pave the path for students who express interest in college but for various reasons might never make it. The College is covering all instructional costs, which have been estimated by Verde Campus  Perey at $1,500 to $2,000 per student.  Students who complete the summer session will receive regular college credit for the courses they take. It is too bad that all of the slots were not filled for this program.  

The program is expected to run classes from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday thru Thursday.  This schedule  allows several students to keep their afternoon and evening part-time jobs.  The program begins June 1 and will end July 23.

Experimental LEED program moving forward

LEED program has seats for 24 students on each side of Mingus; Verde Valley has 20 so far

The eight-week pilot LEAD program, which begins this summer, is moving forward.  This is a particularly important new program because it is intended to pave the path for students who express interest in college but for various reasons might never make it. The College is covering all instructional costs, which have been estimated by Verde Campus Executive Dean James Perey at $1,500 to $2,000 per student.

LEAD SUMMER PROGRAMPerey reports that he has received 20 potential nominees to the program so far: ten from Mingus Union High School and ten from Camp Verde High School.  (None from Sedona Red Rock High School.)  Perey says that “a few of those want to go over to Prescott.” Dean Perey also says he hopes he will have from 12 to 15 on the Verde Campus.

Stuart Blacklaw, Yavapai Community College Vice President for instruction and student development, says that the College is still getting applications. He indicated that the College had not heard from as many different school districts as it had hoped. There are   24 seats in each program on each side of Mingus Mountain (total 48) and the College  expects to fill them.

The College will assess the issue of transportation for the students after the students are seated.  It may be possible to provide some transportation for Verde Valley students.

 The program  runs from June 1 to July 30 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m on the Verde Campus.  The 2 p.m. time was selected because some attendees will work in the afternoon and evening.

 Questions about the Lead program can be sent to Stuart.Blacklaw@yc.ed or mailed to Blacklaw at Yavapai College, 1100 E. Sheldon St., Prescott, AZ 86301. He may be called at 928-717-7778.

LEAD program nominations

Lead Program aims at attracting students who might “never make it”

LEAD SUMMER PROGRAMThe eight-week pilot LEAD program, which begins this summer, is intended to pave the path for students who express interest in college but for various reasons might never make it. This is according to Stuart Blacklaw, Yavapai Community College Vice President for instruction and student development.  However, to get into the program, a student must be nominated.  Here is a partial explanation.

1. The program is open to all students graduating from county high schools this spring.

2. A student be interested in attending college but must be at risk of not showing up in the fall.  

3. Students can be nominated high school faculty, staff or administrators, or they can nominate themselves. A student who self-nominates also needs a letter of support from a secondary teacher or someone else familiar with the student’s academic work.

4. Detailed nomination requirements can be found at www.yc.edu/thelead.  Please click here to go to that web site. Nominations may be emailed to Stuart.Blacklaw@yc.ed or mailed to Blacklaw at Yavapai College, 1100 E. Sheldon St., Prescott, AZ 86301.

5. Review of the nominations  begins March 16, and continues as long as space is available.

6. Questions about the Lead program can be sent to Stuart Blacklaw via email or he may be called at 928-717-7778.

The Community College news release regarding this program can be accessed by clicking here.

LEAD summer program moving forward

 

LEAD Summer program moves ahead on Prescott and Verde campuses

LEAD SUMMER PROGRAMYavapai Community College is moving forward with the “Lead” summer program. LEAD seeks to remove the barriers and create an environment that leads Yavapai County high school graduates to a successful start in college. 

In an interview with Verde Independent reporter Yvonne Gonzales on February 21, Verde Campus executive Dean James Perey said students take an introduction to college course, paired with a sociology or psychology class. The free program amounts to about $1,250 in savings to the students, Perey said. This amount is higher for the Prescott program, which includes free housing for the students.

The program runs from June 1 to July 31. Faculty, staff or administrators in any secondary school in Yavapai County must nominate students by March 16.

You may view a six minute detailed explanation of LEAD given by Vice President Stuart Blackwell at the October, 2014 Governing Board meeting by clicking here.